1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

First Time In India

Discussion in 'Travel advice' started by Louise, Feb 24, 2016.

  1. Louise

    Louise New Member

    It will be my first time in India and I am quite nervous about my trip. It would be my first trip to such a country which has a diverse number of traditions and cultures not to mention languages, although I won't really be going out of North India.

    My first concern is safety especially after rape case in 2012, how safe would you say it is travelling within India and what precautions should one take?

    What is food safety like, is it safe to eat anything or from anywhere?

    Are there any places which you should visit i.e for safety reasons?

    Which is the most safest and cost effective mode of transport?

    Where do suggest shopping for local things should be done like clothes or souvenirs?

    Can you easily get ripped off by sales people, such as shop owners, taxi drivers and especially tourist guides etc.
     
  2. jnorth88

    jnorth88 Active Member

    Safety is always a concern no matter where you travel. The best solution is to travel with someone, and to post your itinerary somewhere so that people can know where to look. Generally, any tourist destination will be fairly safe, and you should have nothing to fear but the potential of petty theft.

    Food is generally safe, and you should be able to determine of a shop or restaurant would be able to satisfy your own personal tastes. Sometimes people get sick from food vendors not because the food is bad, but because they have an expectation they will get sick. Just look for establishments that make you feel comfortable.

    Transportation can vary depending on the distances you go. Taxis, auto rickshaws are cheap, but obviously inter-city traffic is accomplished best by train. You will mostly use taxis, so be sure to check your hotel for typical rates, and ask the drivers before getting in how much a ride to a place will cost.

    You can do shopping all over. Some of the best deals are found in out of the way corners. You just have to keep your eyes open. I could give you a list of malls, and you might not like anything there. I could do the same for markets. But maybe you like the jewelry a woman is selling outside your hotel. Who knows?

    And, yes, you can get ripped. A common practice is for taxi drivers to drop you off at stores where they earn a commission on what you buy. These are generally overpriced places. They will try to sell you rugs, statues, old looking pieces of art, all of which are cheap reproductions. Only buy something if you like it and you are willing to pay the price. Don't worry about too much else.
     
    Chahal likes this.
  3. xTinx

    xTinx Member

    My first concern is safety especially after rape case in 2012, how safe would you say it is travelling within India and what precautions should one take?
    - Do not travel alone, that's all there is to it. Be in a group or with someone you know who is capable of protecting you in case of emergency situations.

    What is food safety like, is it safe to eat anything or from anywhere?
    - Food is generally clean and safe but be more discerning. If you feel uncomfortable with the way a certain dish is prepared, then don't insist on eating it. Go to restaurants or trusted food stalls to be sure. You can check online for complaints or read about the experiences of those who've travelled before you.

    Are there any places which you should visit i.e for safety reasons?
    - Take note of your embassy's location as well as the nearest police station.

    Which is the most safest and cost effective mode of transport?
    - Trains, planes, cabs and morning buses are safe. Just avoid travelling on the wee hours where you're less likely to see people or contact emergency hotlines.

    Where do suggest shopping for local things should be done like clothes or souvenirs?
    - You do your shopping at malls, bazaars/flea markets and/or designated souvenir shops (tourist spots always have one).

    Can you easily get ripped off by sales people, such as shop owners, taxi drivers and especially tourist guides etc?
    - Yes, you can if you're not careful. You should ask natives or do some research about the prices before setting off anywhere or making a purchase.
     
    Chahal likes this.
  4. tabby

    tabby Member

    The first two replies are pretty exhaustive. I doubt if there's anything more I can add. But if there is, don't let FEAR get in the way of your enjoyment of the trip. I believe the greatest benefit of traveling is it best quells your fears and expectations. A lot of the bad stuff we read on the Internet or see on the news, while may be true, are more often than not EXCEPTIONS and NOT the RULES.
    I can recall during a trip to Bangkok, the news in my home country were of riots and of people getting killed in BKK. Friends and family discouraged us from going ahead with the trip because of the current news.
    Well, the BKK we experienced couldn't be farther from the news we heard back in the home country. Luck, coincidence - who knows?
    Wherever you are in the world, be it at home or in a foreign country, bad things may or may not happen.

    So, yeah - don't fret too much. JUST be mindful of your surroundings.
     
  5. Pazooh

    Pazooh New Member

    Hi.

    I was having the exact same questions a few months ago. I would suggest checking out my threads, people have posted a BUNCH of extremely useful advice. So feel free to check it out.

    In my opinion, you should relax a bit. Precaution is good, but don't let it run your experience. India is an exotic country and there is much to see. Don't miss out on it because you're paranoid.
     
  6. jnorth88

    jnorth88 Active Member

    Well I agree you should never be paranoid, I think a lot of travelers do not do enough to prepare. If we all held ourselves to a bit of a higher standard, many of the problems that tourists face would go away. This goes for security concerns, but also how tourists sometimes act. We all encounter the stereotype of the Ugly American, or the Ugly Chinese, people who go somewhere foreign and make a mess of things. If we tried to be more careful, cautious, considerate, this might all be avoided. Going on a trip does not always entitle you to wear flipflops and get drunk in the street.
     

Share This Page