1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Traffic In Bangalore

Discussion in 'South India' started by thedeatheater1410, Feb 16, 2016.

Tags:
  1. I am going to live in Bangalore for two months in summer but my accommodation is not fixed yet. I would prefer a place near my workplace but the rent is pretty high there. I am getting a place far away from there but I have heard traffic in Bangalore is a big problem. Which areas are prone to this and what are all the public transport vehicles available?
     
  2. jnorth88

    jnorth88 Active Member

    Traffic is very bad, and probably will only get worse. The transportation is the same as pretty much anywhere. Even some light commuter rail. You will really need to know your path to figure out the best option. Hopefully, India will get some improvements to their mass transit and road system. They are implementing advanced pod taxis in certain areas, with other options coming on line in several years. But expect it to be bad.
     
  3. briannagodess

    briannagodess Well-Known Member

    Hello there!

    Bangalore traffic is known worldwide. In fact, it ranked 6th in the world, for the cities with the worst traffics. So anyway, here are the general areas to avoid when you're in Bangalore, as these are notorious for their bumper to bumper traffic:
    • Shivajinagar, Wilson Garden, Mysore Road Junction, Richmond Circle, Bellary Road and Airport Road.
    Perhaps, there are different reasons as to why the traffic in Bangalore has lead to this. It might be a combination of a sudden increase in population in the city and the resulting increase in vehicles. Over the last few years, population growth has increased to over 65% in the city. And of course, with that comes an increase in vehicles as well. The vehicle population is about 4.2 million or 1 vehicle for every 2 individuals. That's a staggering increase and it's no wonder why traffic in the city is so bad.

    Of course, we cannot blame everything on those reasons. There has to be some problem with the government as well. The first problem would be the poor quality of construction work in the already laid roads. Then, there is no coordination with the different government bodies, like the sewage department and the water supply department, hence there are problematic issues with their sewage systems and water systems.

    And lastly, the development of new roads, like the Bangalore Metro, has been quite slow. It's supposed to be the solution for the traffic but in a weird way, it's also contributing to the traffic.

    So, what are your transportation options? Well, here they are:
    • BMTC Buses - This is also known as the Bangalore Metropolitan Transportation Corporation. These buses travel within the city and they have different types: Ordinary bus, Pushpak, Suvarna, JNurm, Atal Sarige, Volvo, Vayu Vajra (Volvo) and Mercedes Benz.
    • Private Buses - Some private bus operators also ply around the city.
    • Auto Rickshaws - These are metered and they are great for travelling to short distances within the city.
    • Taxis - These are the most expensive option but they're very convenient. They're also metered so you won't have to negotiate the fare with the driver.
    Just remember to allot at least an hour or two before your schedule especially if you are from a distance area. Even a simple ride from the airport to the city centre can take an hour or two depending on the traffic.

    I hope this helps. Good luck!
     
  4. rz3300

    rz3300 Member

    Well if there was one thing that I was glad we did not see in India, it was traffic. We were never in any really urban place or city so it was never really an issue for us, but other people that we traveled with certainly had some horror stories for themselves. We were lucky too because I know that we did not really prepare to have to deal with it, so if it caused delays or anything we might have been in trouble. I guess it just stresses the importance of planning ahead, which can never be understated.
     

Share This Page